Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Dam Inundation: A dam inundation is an area located downstream of a dam that would be flooded in the event of a failure of the dam or an uncontrolled release of water. Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone: Like the special flood hazard area, the NHD report will tell you based on county, state and federal guidelines if the property is in a potentially vulnerable area. The area takes in consideration the vegetation, topography, climate, and fire history of the area to give a determination whether the house is located or not in a high fire zone. Wildland Fire: This area can be in conjunction with the very high fire hazard severity zone. This area specifically focuses on if the home is located near lands with natural vegetation such as forest, brush and grass. Earthquake Fault Zone: If the home is located near a fracture or zone of fractures between two blocks of rock, the home will be listed on the NHD report as being located near an earthquake fault zone. Seismic Hazard Zone: A Seismic Hazard Zone is a regulatory zone that encompasses areas prone to liquefaction (failure of water-saturated soil) and earthquake-induced landslides. Liquefaction occurs when loose, water-saturated sediments lose strength and fail during strong ground shaking. The above 6 categories are areas that are not obvious to the eye, but could have an impact on the home, but there is a lot more information you can get out of the NHD report regarding taxes and assessments, geological, noise and land use just to name a few. The NHD has a lot of valuable information, so much in fact that getting the report also gives a buyer a minimum 3 day right of recission time frame. It is most important for the seller to provide the NHD report on time and for the buyer to fully read and review the NHD report once they get it. As always, the best way to purchase real estate is by using a local Realtor® who stays up to date and informed on the ever-changing world of real estate. This article is written by Allie Malone, Chief Operating Officer at RE/MAX Grupe Gold. Allie is a broker with over 18 years of real estate experience. Information was provided by the California Association of Realtors. " />

What’s in a Natural Hazard Disclosure Report?

What’s in a Natural Hazard Disclosure Report?

When either selling or purchasing a home most people have similar concerns. If you are the seller, your thoughts are on what you need to do to your home to get it ready to put on the market and what price you want to get for your home. Buyers tend to think along the lines of what they want in a home and how much they are willing to spend. Both parties are thinking about the home itself and what it has to offer in regarding to the amenities inside the home. What a lot of people don’t know is that it isn’t just about what is in the home but what type of area the home is located in.

What most real estate transactions require is a third-party report called the Natural Hazard Disclosure report, or commonly known as an NHD. An NHD report provides information on the surroundings that home is located in. The NHD has several important segments which provide you with information on the property that you wouldn’t know just by visiting the home. There are 6 major areas that the NHD will provide you with and tell you if the home is in that vicinity:

Special Flood Hazard Area: This will tell you if your home meets the criteria of being in an area of potential flooding dictated by maps created by county, state, and federal guidelines.

Dam Inundation: A dam inundation is an area located downstream of a dam that would be flooded in the event of a failure of the dam or an uncontrolled release of water.

Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone: Like the special flood hazard area, the NHD report will tell you based on county, state and federal guidelines if the property is in a potentially vulnerable area. The area takes in consideration the vegetation, topography, climate, and fire history of the area to give a determination whether the house is located or not in a high fire zone.

Wildland Fire: This area can be in conjunction with the very high fire hazard severity zone. This area specifically focuses on if the home is located near lands with natural vegetation such as forest, brush and grass.

Earthquake Fault Zone: If the home is located near a fracture or zone of fractures between two blocks of rock, the home will be listed on the NHD report as being located near an earthquake fault zone.

Seismic Hazard Zone: A Seismic Hazard Zone is a regulatory zone that encompasses areas prone to liquefaction (failure of water-saturated soil) and earthquake-induced landslides. Liquefaction occurs when loose, water-saturated sediments lose strength and fail during strong ground shaking.

The above 6 categories are areas that are not obvious to the eye, but could have an impact on the home, but there is a lot more information you can get out of the NHD report regarding taxes and assessments, geological, noise and land use just to name a few. The NHD has a lot of valuable information, so much in fact that getting the report also gives a buyer a minimum 3 day right of recission time frame. It is most important for the seller to provide the NHD report on time and for the buyer to fully read and review the NHD report once they get it.

As always, the best way to purchase real estate is by using a local Realtor® who stays up to date and informed on the ever-changing world of real estate.

This article is written by Allie Malone, Chief Operating Officer at RE/MAX Grupe Gold. Allie is a broker with over 18 years of real estate experience. Information was provided by the California Association of Realtors.